December 5, 2014

Race Relations: Do it for America's survival

It is time to recognize all of us are in this together. Color does not matter. If we don’t, we will be surrendering our world influence to other nations, most notably China. They are smiling as we commit similar mistakes they made in their past.

President Obama was right when in 2004 he said,
 “There is not a liberal America and a conservative America—there is the United States of America. There is not a Black America and a White America and Latino America and Asian America—there's the United States of America.
 If we cannot get along for any other reason, let’s do it for our own survival. We need to utilize all our resources and that includes citizens of all races. If we don't we will not keep up. Improving results from education, both black and white, must be a top priority. We cannot waste any resources we have, especially the human mind. The chart below shows our knowledge advantage over much of the world and we are losing it.
I was in high school and college during the civil rights movement in the 60's. We have come a long way but progress stalled. The headlines today are filled with police beatings and killings of black males. I suggest we focus on the rest of the world catching up with us, both economically and militarily. If we don’t we are doomed to repeating the mistakes of China that go back as far to the 15th century.

Prior to that time China ruled the world. They were arrogant and felt it was not possible for the Chinese to learn anything from the rest of mankind. China was in this state of mind until the mid 18th century when the tiny country of England, with their modernized army took Hong Kong from China without much resistance, For the Chinese this begun the Century of Shame. China, despite the size of its population, could not compete against the modernized British navy.

Because of  of not keeping up technologically, as a result of poor education, China was forced to sign treaties that demanded Britain and other sovereign nations be looked upon by China as equals , thus shattering the centuries old thought that China was the Middle Kingdom and the rest of the world was lower in culture and tradition.

Other events that were part of the century of humiliation included unequal treaties where Briton forced one-sided agreements on China. These treaties were followed by the First Sino-Japanese War resulting in the Twenty-One Demands by Japan in the early 20th century, and the Second Sino-Japanese War from 1937 to 1945. In this period, China lost all the wars it fought and often  forced to give major concessions to the great powers in later treaties.

Beginning after 1945 China was determined not to commit the same mistake of having a poorly educated population ever again. This brings us to today. Per a research study completed by the National Intelligence Council,
"By 2030 Asia will be well on its way to returning to being the world’s powerhouse, just as it was before 1500." 
Per a study by the Center For American Progress another problem is the lack of early childhood education for half of U.S. children and the poor quality of teachers.
"In the United States, high school students who choose to enter undergraduate programs for education have SAT scores on average in the bottom third of all students tested, which stands in sharp contrast to nations with impressive student results,"  The Next Generation/American Progress Report

2 comments:

  1. RE: "When you think about it, we all need help at sometime in our lives…It only makes sense for someone striving to recover from an addition to work with someone who has experienced the road to recovery."

    Amen! I believe this includes most of us. Most of us struggle with addictions--if not to
    heroin or alcohol or tobacco--then to consumerism, the Internet, food, gambling, gaming, blogging, sex, work, wealth... We live in an unbalanced society that emphasizes hyper-individualism and denigrates community. This has triggered a global epidemic of addictions of all types due to feelings of isolation and lack of meaning in one’s life.

    The psychologist and historian Dr. Bruce K. Alexander has devoted his life to the understanding of addiction (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bruce_K._Alexander) His research has concluded:

    1. Drug addiction is only a small corner of the addiction problem. Most serious addictions do not involve either drugs or alcohol.

    2. Addiction is more a social problem than an individual problem. When socially integrated societies are fragmented by internal or external forces, addiction of all sorts increases dramatically, becoming almost universal in extremely fragmented societies.

    3. Addiction arises in fragmented societies because people use it as a way of adapting to extreme social dislocation. As a form of adaptation, addiction is neither a disease that can be cured nor a moral error that can be corrected by punishment and education.

    He has a wonderful website that you might be interested in, given your interest in the
    economy and politics: http://www.brucekalexander.com/ His book “The Globalization of Addiction: A Study in Poverty of the Spirit” is the best book I’ve ever read on addiction.

    ReplyDelete